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Home » Discrimination » HR 101: What Not to Write in Personnel File After Employee Files EEOC Complaint

HR 101: What Not to Write in Personnel File After Employee Files EEOC Complaint

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EEOC Statistics

The human resources manager for the defendant in the recent Texas Court of Appeals case of A&L Industrial Services, Inc. v. Oatis, apparently never took this course.  Largely because of his actions, the plaintiffs—former employees who were terminated—were able to convince a jury not only that they were retaliated against for complaining about discrimination, but also that they were entitled to punitive damages.  What is somewhat surprising is that the appellate court upheld these findings in spite of the fact that the plaintiffs failed to prove their underlying discrimination claim.

To find out what happened, click here, and you will be taken to my post on our firm’s website.


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